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September 2012 - Visible dye/penetrant and fluorescent dye/penetrant

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Written by Administrator
Sunday, 02 September 2012 09:50

In some American papers, standards and specifications, we see the terms "visible dye", "visible penetrant", "fluorescent dye" and "fluorescent penetrant". The definitions of some of these terms are given in the ASTM E1316 standard.

In the ISO standards, we see the terms: "colour contrast penetrant" and "fluorescent penetrant". The definitions of these terms are given in the ISO 12706 standard.
Any time, in France, we called the first ones: "pénétrants colorés", which means "coloured penetrants".

According to our literature review, the penetrants that contain non-fluorescent dyes were first called "dye penetrants"(1), then, "colored dye penetrants"(2). Later, they have been called "colour contrast penetrants", though we are unable to know the source. We assume that this was in the late ‘60s or early ‘70s.

Our point of view is that the term "visible penetrant" is not the right one; better to use the term "colour contrast penetrant" (or "color contrast penetrant", in American.)

Indeed, all the penetrants, be they fluorescent or not, are visible. In fact, should a penetrant be not visible, the inspector could not see the indications of discontinuities.
A colour (color in the US) contrast penetrant is visible under daylight/natural or artificial white light illumination.
A fluorescent penetrant is visible under UV-A radiation.

We anticipate that some of our readers will not agree with us and we will take care of their position on this topic. The discussion is open and your feedback will be welcome. It may be published later with your approval in the "Mail Inbox" section on our Website.


References

(1) US patent 2, 764,556, September 25, 1956, Dye solution flaw inspection composition. L.W Sockman et al.

(2) US patent 2,774,886, December 18, 1956, Method of detecting surface discontinuities. Taber de Forest, Northbrook AND Donald W.Parker.Jr., Chicago, Illinois, assignors, by mesne assignments, to Switzer Brothers Inc., Cleveland, Ohio.


Normative references

• ASTM E1417-05: Standard Practice for Liquid Penetrant Testing, ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, PO Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428-2959, USA, 2005.

• SAE-AMS 2644E: Inspection Material, Penetrant, Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), 400 Commonwealth Drive, Warrendale, Pennsylvania 15096, USA, 2006.

• ASTM E1316-11b Standard Terminology for Nondestructive Examinations, ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, PO Box C700, West Conshohocken, PA, 19428-2959, USA, 2011.

• ISO 3452-1:2008 Non-destructive testing - Penetrant testing - Part 1: General principles, International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2008.

• ISO 3452-2:2006 Non-destructive testing - Penetrant testing - Part 2: Testing of penetrant materials, International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2006.

• ISO 12706:2009 Non-destructive testing - Penetrant testing - Vocabulary, International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2009.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 02 September 2012 10:04 )